Accurate 2230
Its burn rate is ideal for .223/5.56 cartridge. 
AA2230
This is the "Standard" for loading .223/5.56
Nammo Brass
Federal Gold Medal AR Match primers used
Accurate 2230
This is a sperical powder.  It meters great.  You can fit more than you will ever need in a case, making it somewhat dangerous if you overcharge on accident. 
In the range of powders that can be used for 5.56 "normally" this is a medium burn rate powder, while Accurate 2200 would be on the very fast end of spectrum and Accurate 2520 would be toward the slow end.  Accurate 2230 and Accurate 2460 are very similar, except 2460 takes about ~.5 more grains to get similar velocity.  It could be argued that Accurate 2230 is not necessary at all and you could just use Accurate 2460 for every application from 50 grain to 77 grain instead.  There is some validity to that argument.
Being a sphereical powder, it is very easy and consistent to meter.  Very easy handling powder if you want to just mass produce ammo, this is great. 
It is also a reasonable price powder and readily available.
Accurate 2230 is a very high performance powder, as you can see below.  It offers some of the highest velocities available for loads we would call 50-75 grain.  A really good, versatile powder you can't go wrong with in 5.56.  Buy it with confidence.




So...what about AA2230 and what do some cases look like?
 
  • Nammo Brass Case capacity ~29.50 Grains
  • Federal Gold Medal AR Match Primer
  • Top row:  Berger 77 OTM 22.5 Grains 
  • Mid Row:  Sierra BlitzKing 55  25.5 Grains
  • Bot Row: Sierra BlitzKing 55 26.0 Grains
  • 2.255 OAL

  • Nammo Brass Case capacity ~29.50 Grains
  • Federal Gold Medal AR Match Primer
  • Top row:  Berger 77 OTM 22.0 Grains 
  • Mid Row:  Berger 77 OTM 22.3 Grains
  • Bot Row: Berger 77 OTM 22.5 grains
  • 2.255 OAL

  • Nammo Brass Case capacity ~29.50 Grains
  • Federal Gold Medal AR Match Primer
  • Top row:  Berger 55 Match 24.8 Grains 
  • Bot Row: Berger 55 Match 26.0 Grains
  • each load between top and bottom are .3 grains different.  25.1, 25.4, 25.7
  • 2.255 OAL

Accurate 2230 100 YARDS
"ALL" of these loads are above any manufacturer data.  Load at your own risk.  What we load doesn't mean it will be safe for you. Do not load above recommended manufacturer book maximums.

We use WOA "Predator" 20" upper with 25x magnification Viper Gen II.    All shots were 100 yards.

The first loads were off the page, but if they were not that first group was under .7".  Every single load was over book maximums on purpose.  We find book maximums to be very conservative.  As you can see from primer pics above, almost every load has flater primers and many pieces of brass have an "ejector" stamp on the base to different degrees.  No burs, and zero primer popping, but up there WAY over book maximum. 

2800+ FPS out of a 75 grain bullet is very high performance for a 5.56 Rifle that is 20".  As well as 3300+ FPS out of a 55 grain bullet.  That just goes to show, Accurate 2230 is VERY high performance 5.56 powder if you want max velocity.

Of particular note, this is BRAND NEW brass.  We sized this brass after it was cleaned and internal capacity went from 29.8 grains, to after resizing again, to 30.3 grains.  So you get ~.5 grains MORE capacity after its shot and sized.  This will lower pressure slightly from these loads, and change the FPS. 
Accurate 2230 50 YARDS
We find it much easier to aim at the TINY dot with our rig at 50, than 100.  The results are measurably significant at 50 vs 100 we found after years of testing the 2 ranges.
Some of the loads we tried
Load at your own risk.  What we load doesn't mean it will be safe for you. Do not load above recommended manufacturer book maximums.

The top 10 loads there are at 50 yards, the bottom 12 are 100 yards.  The top 10 loads there at 50 yards were done on different day than bottom 12.  Notice the FPS was the same on the Hornady 75 grain, with lower charge?  It was hotter on the top 10 load day.  The MOA is calculated, so no matter what yardage we shoot, it still spits out MOA.  .36 is lowest, and many in the .6-.8 range.  Solid shooting powder, AA2230.

We took extra particular care in selecting brass with nearly identical internal capacity, bullets that weight nearly identical (.02 grain).  This led to much lower than normal standard Deviation for a spherical powder like this.  If you just select at random from your bullets, and from your brass lot, and then meter it without precise measurement, you will more normally get from 20-40 SD.
We think its most likely the small, 5 shot group, why some are as low as 11.  That is oddly low, and not that repeatable we think.